Table of Contents

Famous Historical CGI Images

Note: All images are copyright their respective owners.

1981

Adam Powers, The Juggler © Triple I

Notable for: One of the first successful attempts to create a “photorealistic” animated human.

1982

The Genesis Effect from Star Trek II - The Wrath of Khan © Pixar

Notable for: Particle-based effects

Trivia: The effect was so successful that the footage was also used in Star Trek III as well. At the time, Pixar was Lucasfilm’s Computer Graphics Research Group.

Skeleton Animation System (SAS) © Dave Zeltzer

1983

The Road to Point Reyes © Pixar

Notable for: Particle-based plants, fractal scenery, complex shaders.

Trivia: Point Reyes is located near Pixar, accounting for the name of the REYES ("Renders Everything You See") renderer.

Brilliance © Robert Able & Associates

Trivia: First computer generated 30 second commercial.

The Works, © NYIT

Trivia: The Works was an ambitious attempt in the 1980 by New York Institute of Technology to create a fully CGI film. Although it was a failure (the script was never even fully written), many people involved in the project went on to be key players in other CGI companies.

1984

© Pixar

Notable for: Use of Shade Trees.

1984 from Distributed Ray Tracing paper © Pixar

Notable for: Motion blur, depth of field, penumbras.

The Last Starfighter © Digital Productions

Trivia: Rendered on a Cray X-MP supercomputer.

The Adventures of Andre and Wally B. © Pixar

Notable for: Highly detailed forest backgrounds.

Trivia: John Lasseter wrote Tricks to Animating Characters with a Computer in response to discovering that many people in computer graphics had little or no background in “classical” animation principles, and wanted to know what “cool new technology” the video used.

1985

Young Sherlock Holmes © ILM

1986

Luxo, Jr © Pixar Animation Studios

Notable for: ZBuffer shadow maps.

“A Simple Model of Ocean Waves” A. Fournier and W.T. Reeves

1987

Red’s Dream © Pixar Animation Studios

1988

Tin Toy © Pixar Animation Studios

Notable for: Appearance of human.

Textbook Strike © Tom Porter/Flip Philips

Trivia: Created as the cover of Steve Upstill’s RenderMan Companion book.

1989

Knick Knack © Pixar Animation Studios

Notable for: Being entertaining to non-geeks.

Trivia: When re-released as a theatre short, the size of the mermaid’s breasts were significantly reduced.

The Abyss © 20th Century Fox - Directed by James Cameron

In the sequence a water creature (called Pseudopod) emerges from a pool of water, extends itself and explores an underwater oil-rig and then interacts with live characters. It was done by Industrial Light and Magic (ILM).

 
  images/images.txt · Last modified: 2007/03/12 14:34 by 66.205.143.8 (dcuny)